duskpeterson: (summer night shells)
"The dilemma of evil is that even as it carries out its dark, sinister work, it always ends up strengthening good."

--Roberto Miranda.


What I've been up to )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"If quitting Twitter and ditching the iPhone was relatively easy, Facebook made it as hard as possible, tugging on all the virtual heartstrings they could dredge up from their data. Having selected 'deactivate account' from my settings, I was faced with a gallery of family and friends who I was told would miss me. Fortunately, as someone had tagged the contents of a barbecue grill with my friends' names, this was less of an emotional strain than was intended ('Andrew will miss you,' pleaded a photo of a forlorn and slightly singed chicken drumstick)."

--Mark Hooper: Back to reality: giving up the Internet.



My professional work last month )
Thoughts on the state of my writing and publishing )
duskpeterson: (winter sled)
"This is where someone in the back of the room grouses about how when he was a young reader they didn't have young adult books and he read whatever he could get his hands on, by gum and by golly — he read the Bible and Tolkien and Stephen King and Henry Miller and Penthouse and he did it backwards, in the snow, besieged by ice tigers. 'In my day we didn't need teenage books! We took what books we had and liked it! I once read a soup can for days!'"

--Chuck Wending.

(As a teenager, I was once stuck in a country cottage in England that had no books. For days, I read the telephone directory.)


My professional work last month )
I'm going to publish my young adult fiction )
Little snippets, professional and personal )
Progress with my Internet addiction, or yay parental control restrictions )
duskpeterson: Advent wreath (Advent wreath)
"The other advice [for how to be a successful indie author] isn't anywhere near as sexy. It's also the most obvious. Write. And then write some more. You know what's easier than selling 10,000 books? Selling 5,000 copies of two books. And far easier than that is to sell 3,500 copies of three books."

--David Dalglish.


My professional work last month )
My professional goals for 2016 )
A small sample of what my November was like )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"Day after day, do your work as if you were in business. Handle the customers that come in with dispatch and courtesy. Then think up some work for yourself to do. And do it.

"The [works] you write are your inventory. . . . Back in my fledgling days, I compared myself to a man who had opened a new five-and-ten-cent store. I thought of what he must keep in mind, as he put his inventory on the shelf and waited for customers. No matter how few customers came in to buy, at first, each one was a prospect, each one could buy something, if the commodity was right, if the price was right, and if the need was right. . . .

"Every time I was disappointed [by sales], I thought of the young fellow who opened the five-and-dime store, and how disappointed he must have been whenever people walked through, looked over his inventory, and then ambled on, not even trying to shoplift any of it! . . .

"Fortunately, worrying about theft of material is not a frequent part of the writer's management task. The important, and essential, part of his management job is to keep himself writing."

--Larston D. Farrar: How to Make $18,000 a Year Free-lance Writing (1957).


My professional work last month )
Timelines and characters' ages )
Publishing decisions: subgenre labels and publication frequency )
A visit to North East, Maryland, in Cecil County )
Scheduling decluttering )
duskpeterson: (autumn acorn)
"So, yeah, I'm thinking fanfic is a younger person's game - it's for people who can scan their Twitter, scroll through their Tumblr, bash out a Facebook status without looking, take a quick gander at their RSS feed, do an LJ update crossposted to their Dreamjournal, edit a fanvid and watch the next ep/installment of fill-in-the-blank before it airs anywhere, while doing whatever they do for a living and having a life. All at the same time."

--Heartofslash.


My professional work last month )
Series bible )
Covers and props; or, The Trouble with Trivets )
The final total after three months of decluttering books )
A book that passed my test for 'Gosh, I Must Buy This *Now*' )
duskpeterson: (autumn acorn)
"The thing about reading fanfic (and original slash fic) is that you get used to that particular writing/reading culture after a while. You get used to the frank discussions of sexuality and kink, the close attention to diversity and social justice issues in the text, the unrestrained creativity when it comes to plot. The most amazing, creative, engaging stories I've ever read have almost all been fanfiction, and I think part of that is because there’s no limitations placed on the authors. They’re writing purely out of joy and love for the world and its characters, with no concerns about selling the finished product. The only limit is their imagination.

"Next to that, most mainstream fiction starts tasting like Wonder Bread, you know?"

--Cordelia Kingsbridge.


My professional work last month )
A few factoids about my latest Eternal Dungeon novel, 'Checkmate' )
Posting online fic again! Man, that feels good )
Prop-shopping at antique stores )
My decluttering of books last month )
My web addiction last month )
My family and leisure time last month )
A banner month for good reading )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"She will still talk to people, but it will be in a withdrawn way."

--A priest discussing a new Scottish hermit, as quoted by The Press and Journal.


My professional work last month )
On 'The Eternal Dungeon' )
Writing in the fresh outdoors, research trips, and a rant about heavy furniture) )
Professional trips (mainly Waterman research) and personal trips last month )
Getting a handle on my introversion )
The inauspicious anniversary of my web addiction )

REPLY TO BLOG COMMENTS

As some of you will have noticed, I've been a little backed up in responding to comments to this blog. Unfortunately, I lost all my e-mails prior to April 2014 (yes, that's how backed up I am), but here's my replies to the rest. I hope I didn't miss anyone - if I did, let me know.


Reply to Catana on e-book covers and productivity )
Reply to Dianna Kay on my e-books and the m/m readership )
Reply to Musicman on narratives )
Reply to Angie Fiedler Sutton on Scribe Mozell )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"Housewives were the people who put Trick or Treat for UNICEF boxes in millions of small hands. They were, of course, thrifty (thrift is the signal virtue of the housewife), but many of them were also high-minded, convinced that people ought to help one another out. George Harrison may have held a Concert for Bangladesh, but it was the mothers on my block who sat down and wrote little checks—ten dollars, fifteen dollars—to CARE. Many housewives shared a belief in the power of boycotts, which could so easily be conducted while grocery shopping. I remember hearing my mother's half of a long, complicated telephone discussion about whether it would or would not undermine the housewives' beef strike of 1973 if the caller defrosted and cooked meat bought prior to the strike. Tucked into the aforementioned copy of The Settlement Cook Book, along with handwritten recipes for Chocolate Diamonds and Oma's German Cheesecake, is a small card that reads FREEDOM AND JUSTICE FOR J.P. STEVENS WORKERS. The organizers of that long-ago boycott understood two things: first, that if you were going to cripple a supplier of household goods (J.P. Stevens manufactured table linens and hosiery and blankets), you had to enlist housewives; and second, that you stood a better chance of catching their attention if you printed your slogan on the reverse of a card that contained a table of common metric equivalents, a handy, useful reminder that 1 liter = 1 quart and also that the makers of Finesse hosiery exploited their workers."

--Caitlin Flanagan: Housewife Confidential: A tribute to the old-fashioned housewife, and to Erma Bombeck, her champion and guide.


A note to my readers: If you sent me email before April 2014, please resend it. Due to a computer mishap, I've lost all my email between 2008 and April 2014.

If you sent email after April 2014, and I haven't replied to it yet, feel free to resend it. It should be in my inbox, which I'm still plowing through, but there's no reason you should have to wait any longer than you already have.


My professional work this month )
My reading this month )
My decluttering and homemaking this month )
My personal life this month )

I've saved the best news for last:

I stayed mostly offline in February.

Let me repeat that: I STAYED MOSTLY OFFLINE. If you don't understand the full import of that, let me repeat what I wrote in my last journal entry:

o--o--o


It's the web that's the problem. And it was a very serious problem by the time that I pulled the plug in mid-January - against my will; my body went into a state of collapse, and I ended up with the flu.

Before that happened, do you know how long I'd been online? Five days. I got nine hours of sleep during that time.

So I've now officially moved "web usage" from "medical problem" to "medical emergency."

o--o--o


So hurrah, yes, major progress in having an offline life. Which is why I actually have accomplishments to list in this blog entry.
duskpeterson: (winter sled)
"Author's note: Oh God, I don't know what came over me. I'll go iron my hands now."

--Maculategiraffe.


This post is divided into parts, the first part aimed at my readers, the second part aimed at my fellow writers. Those of you who are both can read both parts.


For my readers: What I did right and wrong in 2014 )
For my readers: What I plan to do in 2015 )
For my colleagues: What I did right and wrong in 2014 )
For my colleagues: What I plan to do in 2015 )


In order to achieve all of the above plans, I'm going to have to tackle my web addiction and my schedule. I'll write more about that in my next post, about my personal life last year and this year.
duskpeterson: Advent wreath (Advent wreath)
"The fiction writers who earn a living are those who consistently and steadily produce quality stories. Granted, if you're prolific enough, and you're working in a hot market, you can compensate for quality with quantity. That's how you know there is no God."

-- Josh Lanyon: Man, Oh Man! Writing Quality M/M Fiction.

*


My writing desk.


Unpacking marathon )
Going offline and reading slowly )
About those book covers )
Covers and NaNo )
Some things I learned during NaNoWriMo )
Wrapping up NaNo )
Rainbow Awards and Thanksgiving )
Ebook covers; plus, holiday events )
A pause for the headlines )
New cover sales results; plus, Christmas preparations, or lack thereof )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"Probably it does not matter much where one begins [a story], so long as one begins somewhere - and some time. The beginning is almost always, again so far as we are concerned, made by an effort of will: a 'come-next-Monday-we-start-a-new-one' decision. A mystery writer who waits patiently for a mood to encompass him, for an idea to strike, may find starvation, or other employment, striking first."

--Richard Lockridge: "The Craft of Crime." In The Writer's Handbook (1950), edited by Helen Hull.


"Every morning between 9 and 12 I go to my room and sit before a piece of paper. Many times, I just sit for three hours with no ideas coming to me. But I know one thing. If an idea does come between 9 and 12 I am there ready for it."

--Flannery O'Connor.'


"There's a life outside the Internet. It's true. I heard it online."

--Johnny B. Truant in Sean Platt and Johnny B. Truant's Write. Publish. Repeat.


NaNo Eve preparations )
First day of NaNo )
Where my new stories are going )
Stupid internet addiction )
Getting myself back in gear )
The three-hour example )
How I write )
Still struggling )
And the saga continues )
Wrapping up the first half of the month )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"The writing process is notoriously cyclical - and dangerous if one is prone to either mania or depression or both. There is the 'up' of an inspired bout of writing and the 'down' of seemingly fruitless labor and revisions, and times when one is incapable of writing at all. When I was a very young writer, I hungered for more, always more. But deep down, I had so little faith in myself, let alone in my vocation as a writer, that I saw each poem as potentially my last. Having invested my psychic and emotional energies in a romantic notion of 'inspiration,' I would panic whenever the ability to write seemed to leave me. Now, rather than succumb to despair during my dry spells, I generally employ a prairie metaphor and think of it as a lifesaver, a dying down to the roots during a drought. Although the grasses look dead, they are merely dormant, and the slightest bit of moisture will occasion a change."

--Kathleen Norris: The Quotidian Mysteries: Laundry, Liturgy and "Women's Work".


Writing success )
Internet addiction fail )
Internet addiction fail, part two; plus, m/m covers )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"It's a sad day when you're 33 years old, and you've just set up the parental controls on your WoW account so you can't play late into the wee small hours of the night."

--Name withheld to protect the addict.


I've decided to do NaNoWriMo this year. If any of you are planning to do it too, I'd love to have some more Writing Buddies. Here's my NaNoWriMo profile.


More of the usual struggles )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
sometimes im like "Eternal Dungeon police AU"

but them im like

oh wait that happened and Layle broke the computers

*

okay but

futurepunk layle and elsdon

#LAYLE WOULD DIE NEVERMIND

*

can you imagine though

"layle/elsdon highschool au, M/M, hxc, M rating for later chapters"

*

Eternal dungeon au where layle and elsdon are summer camp counselors

*

an eternal dungeon au where my heart isnt broken every fucking chapter

*

Eternal Dungeon/Sonic The Hedgehog crossover:

au, darkfic, mcd, abuse, dubcon

"Sonic the Hedgehog made no reply. His eyes were searching the Seeker's belt, looking for a rope or a chain or any other sign of what was to take place here. His gaze jerked up, though, as the Seeker said, 'Mr. Hedgehog, do you enjoy pain?'"

109 chapters. 7959690403020000034 words. incomplete.

#MR. DUSK IM SO SORRY


--From the Dusk-Peterson-tagged Tumblr posts of Albert (aka valtiels and a zillion other masks), which keep me perpetually entertained.


Before I get to the Daily Life stuff, some of you may be interested in this list:

Original Slash Creators.

The Slash Pile is asking writers and artists of original lgbtq works to add their names to the list. You don't have to be a slasher. Here's the sign-up sheet to be listed.


In which I struggle with the issue of how to balance my work life and my health )
duskpeterson: (summer night shells)
"Follow our instructions. Seriously, I'm not kidding. I don't care if you are a publishing expert with 20 years experience, follow the damn instructions. There is one exception. For those who want to fail, spend 300% more time on the formatting, and have no fear of being driven terminally insane, and are generally narcissistic bastards, you may do as you please. For the rest of you, follow the instructions. Repeat after me, 'I will follow the instructions in the style guide or have a pox upon my house.' Now say it 37 times, turn around and hop on one leg."

--Brian Meeks, parodying Mark Coker putting "the fear of god" in self-publishers in The Smashwords Style Guide.


Just to alert you folks that I'm switching over to a once-a-month update schedule for my website and blog. I'm much more productive if I stay off the web to work on a batch of books that I release all at once. So you'll see me again in about a month's time.


Work, work, work )

It does eventually get easier than this, right?
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"The most dangerous lie we tell ourselves is that writing novels shouldn't feel like a job. It encourages younger and newer writers to work for little or no pay. It convinces those with a book or two under their belt that there's something wrong with them when the writing is no longer fun all the time. Worst of all, when we hit bumps along the road, we're convinced we're the only ones to feel this type of burnout, and that there's something wrong with us because of it.

"One of the most powerful things I ever did for my career, and my continued sanity, was to get to know other writers facing the same challenges. Social networks like Twitter and Facebook, supplemented with the occasional convention, have connected me with incredible people willing to share their own fraught publishing journeys. What stunned me more than anything else is how each of us thought our experiences were entirely unique, when it turned out we shared many of the same fears and frustrations.

"What will keep me writing far longer than I expected is not, necessarily, my passion, my talent, or the romantic story of how stringing together words will help me transcend the mortal plane. No, the deeper I get into the publishing game, the more I realize that what will keep me going when everything crumbles around me is the incredible support, advice, and commiseration I've gotten from other writers."

--Kameron Hurley: Busting Down the Romantic Myth of Writing Fiction, and Mitigating Author Burnout.


Question for you folks: Do any of you buy the doc editions of my ebooks? I'm trying to decide whether they're worth continuing.


Software struggles galore and working out a proper writing schedule )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"– The cabin pressure has changed, so let's all place the plastic masks of reality over our noses and mouths and inhale deeply for a moment: It's taken me since December 2012 to have the two crazy fuckers who make up the Legion 'find me.' (Thank you again.) And that's with extensive blogging, blog-hopping (including creating my OWN ill-attended hop which is really the ultimate in candlelit shrines to Self in the basement), interviews, guest posts, reviews by GODDAMNED MOTHERFUCKING Violet Blue (hi Violet), pimping myself all over the goddamned place 'til I am disgusted with myself. All that pimping and I'll still be dead before I have twenty readers. FACT.

"– Wonder if going totally underground (maybe a blog post here and there when the funny mood strikes) and writing stuff I think is funny or smutty or both, in whatever 'genre' (maybe a new one I invent), and then very quietly uploading it all to Amazon and the usual places, but with no pimping anymore, no blog hops, nothing but a single 'Here is a new book and I am very excited to announce this but now back to Wheel of Fortune' post on the blog, just on the day it’s uploaded, would work? Like, that would be it. Workable? Just as 'effective' as what I've been trying all this time?"

--Sheri Savill, whose BDSM parody Bound for Disappointment looks quite worthy of readers, judging from the online sample.


Getting back to work, thank goodness )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"I'm closing in on 62. I might have 10 productive years left, 20 if I'm lucky and don't get hit by any more minivans. When I ask myself how much of that time I want to spend playing online cribbage or watching cute-kitty videos instead of visiting with my family and friends, goofing with my idiotic dog, or out riding my motorcycle, the answer is not too much."

--Stephen King: My Screen Addiction.

Read more... )

So which fiction stylists do you folks like? I'm dying for recs, so that I can find some more good writers to read.

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