Mar. 19th, 2017

duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
A dried wreath of flowers


"Layle had spent most of the afternoon attempting to figure out how to revise the Code in a manner that was unlikely to draw the wrong sort of attention from the High Torturer."

The Eternal Dungeon's youngest torturer has a special talent. He's about to discover what it is, at the worst of moments.

ΒΆ Read online or download as a free e-book: New-Fashioned (The Eternal Dungeon:).


My bio )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
I'm refining my content ratings at Archive of Our Own (AO3), and I'm also going to start posting at Wattpad.

Here's Wattpad's guide to content ratings. AO3 doesn't offer guidance on what its ratings mean; they simply say, "This is left to the creator's judgment."

Here's my problem: I watch virtually no television or movies, and what I watch isn't very violent. (I think the most violent movie I ever saw is the one that gave rise to the PG-13 rating.) Most of what I read is pre-1980 literature, mainly children's fiction. As a result, I don't have a good sense of what current violence ratings mean. (I think I have a decent handle on sex ratings.) In particular, I don't know the difference between these categories:

* Intense violence.

* Nongraphic violence.

* Graphic violence.

Since I write a lot of fiction on captivity or on war, I really need to understand the difference between these three categories. Can anyone help?

(If you know my stories, maybe you could give those as examples. If not, other examples of literary violence would help.)

Edited to add: Spoilers for the first volume of The Eternal Dungeon in the Comments below.

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