duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
Imprisonment. Slavery. War. Love. Historical adventure speculative fiction & suspenseful lgbtq novels: duskpeterson.com

I have lots of fiction at my website.

This blog is intended for people who are permitted to read fiction and nonfiction in the adult section of their public library. Versions of this blog: Dreamwidth | InsaneJournal | LiveJournal. I'm also at Tumblr.


To receive entries from this blog by e-mail,
subscribe to Dusk Peterson's updates list.
You can unsubscribe at any time.







PROGRESS METERS FOR 2017


Progress meters courtesy of Rikki A. Hyperion.


Wordage


19929 / 250000 (7.97%)


New stories


2 / 12 (16.67%)


New collections and reissues


2 / 30 (6.67%)
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
I'm refining my content ratings at Archive of Our Own (AO3), and I'm also going to start posting at Wattpad.

Here's Wattpad's guide to content ratings. AO3 doesn't offer guidance on what its ratings mean; they simply say, "This is left to the creator's judgment."

Here's my problem: I watch virtually no television or movies, and what I watch isn't very violent. (I think the most violent movie I ever saw is the one that gave rise to the PG-13 rating.) Most of what I read is pre-1980 literature, mainly children's fiction. As a result, I don't have a good sense of what current violence ratings mean. (I think I have a decent handle on sex ratings.) In particular, I don't know the difference between these categories:

* Intense violence.

* Nongraphic violence.

* Graphic violence.

Since I write a lot of fiction on captivity or on war, I really need to understand the difference between these three categories. Can anyone help?

(If you know my stories, maybe you could give those as examples. If not, other examples of literary violence would help.)

Edited to add: Spoilers for the first volume of The Eternal Dungeon in the Comments below.
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
A dried wreath of flowers


"Layle had spent most of the afternoon attempting to figure out how to revise the Code in a manner that was unlikely to draw the wrong sort of attention from the High Torturer."

The Eternal Dungeon's youngest torturer has a special talent. He's about to discover what it is, at the worst of moments.

Read online or download as a free e-book: New-Fashioned (The Eternal Dungeon:).


My bio )
duskpeterson: (bookshelves)
A dried wreath of flowers


"During the dawn hours at the Eternal Dungeon, as the day shift yawned itself awake and the night shift yawned itself to bed, the talk turned, as it always did, to the injustices of being a guard."

Three guards and a mysterious substance provide a temptation too great to be missed . . . especially when two torturers add their skills to the mix.

Soon three very different men – a married man who is committed to respect and honor, a bachelor harboring secret desires, and a soldier with an unfulfilled ambition – will find themselves caught in a trap. Their rescue will come from an unexpected quarter.

Read online or download as a free e-book: Green Ruin (The Eternal Dungeon).


My bio )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
Engarian's blurb: After the defeat of Sauron, Aragorn turns to the job of ruling and rebuilding. He is visited by his Steward escorting two men who are worried about the future of their jobs - torturers in the dungeon.

Aragorn cast a sharp look at his Steward, then focused on the two men standing respectfully, in partially hidden in shadow. He beckoned, waving them forward. "Come closer. You look somewhat familiar. . . . Smith, isn't it?"

(Ohmygosh, my characters have met Strider. I'm not sure I can contain my palpitations.)

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
5 6 78 9 1011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Mar. 25th, 2017 09:35 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios