duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
Imprisonment. Slavery. War. Love. Suspenseful historical fantasy: duskpeterson.com

My writings: E-books, online fiction, and online nonfiction

This blog is intended for people who are permitted to read fiction and nonfiction in the adult section of their public library. Parental supervision is recommended.

Versions of this blog: Dreamwidth | InsaneJournal | LiveJournal.


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CURRENT CHALLENGES


(Original challenges slightly altered, because I never do things quite the way other folks do.)

One hour of writing a dayPledge to get offline 5 days a week100 DarkficsNaNoWriMo


PROGRESS METERS FOR 2015


Progress meters courtesy of Rikki A. Hyperion.


Wordage


17570 / 300000 (5.86%)


Manuscripts submitted to magazines and publishers


2 / 12 (16.67%)


New works published


0 / 12 (0.00%)


New collections of previously published stories


0 / 3 (0.00%)


Reissues (only if I have the time!)


0 / 12 (0.00%)

duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
Rolf and Ranger: Falls Chance Ranch. Also available in ebook format (including stories not yet available at their website) at their forum and in the Files section of their Yahoo Group.

I originally thought this online fiction series was a domestic discipline tale. And then I thought this was a series like Maculategiraffe's The Slave Breakers, centered on a loving, hierarchically ordered, highly unconventional surrogate family.

It was the incongruity that was getting to him. People didn't generally have disasters while companionably eating muffins together.


The series Falls Chance Ranch (currently consisting of three completed novels, a work-in-progress novel, and numerous shorter works) is both these things, but in addition to that, it is one of the most powerful psychological studies of a man that I've encountered in fiction.

The rest of the review )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"I went on to wonder what it really would be like to share a house with one of the heroes from some of my favourite gay books? . . .

"Laurie from The Charioteer . . . is far too intellectual for me. It'd be all 'But Aeschylus said . . .' Sod Aeschylus. Have another gin and tonic, for gawd's sake.

"Sebastian Flyte from Brideshead Revisted. Argh! No no no no no no no. He'd turn up, pissed as a fart, having left his family and he'd stay for some indeterminate time, taking up the best bedroom, making me make tea and quails eggs (you try and get them in Great Yarmouth, I just challenge you) for him and Aloysius and inviting his bitchy friends over to eat me out of house and home."

Erastes: You Like the Book - But Could You Live With Him?


The goodies )
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"Housewives were the people who put Trick or Treat for UNICEF boxes in millions of small hands. They were, of course, thrifty (thrift is the signal virtue of the housewife), but many of them were also high-minded, convinced that people ought to help one another out. George Harrison may have held a Concert for Bangladesh, but it was the mothers on my block who sat down and wrote little checks—ten dollars, fifteen dollars—to CARE. Many housewives shared a belief in the power of boycotts, which could so easily be conducted while grocery shopping. I remember hearing my mother's half of a long, complicated telephone discussion about whether it would or would not undermine the housewives' beef strike of 1973 if the caller defrosted and cooked meat bought prior to the strike. Tucked into the aforementioned copy of The Settlement Cook Book, along with handwritten recipes for Chocolate Diamonds and Oma's German Cheesecake, is a small card that reads FREEDOM AND JUSTICE FOR J.P. STEVENS WORKERS. The organizers of that long-ago boycott understood two things: first, that if you were going to cripple a supplier of household goods (J.P. Stevens manufactured table linens and hosiery and blankets), you had to enlist housewives; and second, that you stood a better chance of catching their attention if you printed your slogan on the reverse of a card that contained a table of common metric equivalents, a handy, useful reminder that 1 liter = 1 quart and also that the makers of Finesse hosiery exploited their workers."

--Caitlin Flanagan: Housewife Confidential: A tribute to the old-fashioned housewife, and to Erma Bombeck, her champion and guide.


A note to my readers: If you sent me email before April 2014, please resend it. Due to a computer mishap, I've lost all my email between 2008 and April 2014.

If you sent email after April 2014, and I haven't replied to it yet, feel free to resend it. It should be in my inbox, which I'm still plowing through, but there's no reason you should have to wait any longer than you already have.


My professional work this month )
My reading this month )
My decluttering and homemaking this month )
My personal life this month )

I've saved the best news for last:

I stayed mostly offline in February.

Let me repeat that: I STAYED MOSTLY OFFLINE. If you don't understand the full import of that, let me repeat what I wrote in my last journal entry:

o--o--o


It's the web that's the problem. And it was a very serious problem by the time that I pulled the plug in mid-January - against my will; my body went into a state of collapse, and I ended up with the flu.

Before that happened, do you know how long I'd been online? Five days. I got nine hours of sleep during that time.

So I've now officially moved "web usage" from "medical problem" to "medical emergency."

o--o--o


So hurrah, yes, major progress in having an offline life. Which is why I actually have accomplishments to list in this blog entry.
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
"More than anything else, I think writing is just a lot of fun. It's a great way to revisit that rollicking, playful space where we spent our days in as kids. Back then, making up stories was our chief occupation. Give a seven-year-old a blank piece of paper and a marker, they're good for hours. There are a lot of adventures and people and animals and kingdoms and trucks and battles and princesses in a piece of paper.

"Somewhere around adolescence, though, most of us stop visiting those imaginary worlds. We get self-conscious. We see that other kids are much better writers or artists than we are, so we cede that creative space to them. And they in turn cede it to others who are better still. The blank page stops being an invitation and becomes intimidating.

"But the impulse to create and make and dream is still with us. It doesn't go away. It just waits, patiently, for us to find a way back to it again. For some adults, it happens through art classes or music lessons. For me, it was through NaNoWriMo. However you get back there, it just feels pretty incredible when you arrive."

--Chris Baty.


My rollicking, playful space )


To those of you write: What are your stages of writing?

March 2015

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